Wednesday, 30 March 2016

The Catholic Church Alone. The One True Church of Christ. Part 31.

SIX VOLUMES IN ONE
BY THE DISTINGUISHED EXPONENTS OF CATHOLICISM
REV. HENRY DODRIDGE, D. D.
REV. HENRY EDWARD MANNING, D. D.
REV. F. LEWIS, of Granada
REV. STEPHEN KEENAN
REV. BERNARD VAUGHAN, S. J.
REV. THOMAS N. BURKE, O. P.


THE THIRD COMMANDMENT.

Q. What is the third commandment ?

A. Remember thou keep holy the Sabbath day.

Q. When was this day first appointed to be kept holy?

A. God sanctified it, and ordered it should be a day of rest on the seventh day after the creation, and that men might give thanks for the benefit of the creation. Gen. ii. 2. And it is highly probable, the true believers in the law of nature, observed it as a day of rest and devotion.

Q. How came it to be altered to Sunday, the first day of the week, which is the first day after the Sabbath ?

A. Because it was only a ceremonial law, obliging the Jews, as to the seventh day, though it was a moral precept in the main, obliging all persons to return thanks to God, for the creation and all other blessings. Now the day was altered by the Apostles, in commemoration of our Blessed Saviour's resurrection, and the descent of the Holy Ghost; which happened the first day after the Sabbath.

Q. What things are forbidden on that day?

A. As the day was ordered to be kept holy by the authority of the Church, so the Church has commanded all persons to abstain from servile works, traffic and courts of judicature.

Q. What things are strictly commanded by this commandment?

A. As the two former commandments contain our duty in heart and words; so by this we are commanded to sanctify the Sabbath or Lord's Day to Almighty God by actual service. Exod. xx. Jer. xvii. 27. In giving him that public worship which the Church prescribes, viz.: To hear mass, and spend the day in prayer, in hearing instructions, reading good books, examining and detesting what we have done amiss, and the like: and therefore those who spend this day in idleness, sports, vanity, idle visits, drinking, gaming, and the like, do not comply full)' with the end of this commandment, nor with the Church's desire concerning it.

Q. When is it that persons may be dispensed with, to work upon Sundays?

A. Only in cases of absolute necessity, or when the work is very inconsiderable.

Q. When may persons be excused from being-present at mass?

A. In case of sickness, necessary business, or want of opportunity, so that they are at too great a distance.

Q. Let me hear some particular cases, where persons may be excused or are inexcusable in laboring and omitting to hear mass on Sundays.

A. Servile works are such as are usually performed by servants only, as digging, ploughing, mechanical works; but not writing, studying, etc. Apothecaries are excused in making up medicines, and cooks in preparing victuals by necessity: so cattle may be fed, or any great loss hindered, by laboring on that day; as the loss by fire or water: so glass-makers and laborers in forges, may attend their fires; yet mass, and the rest, is to be attended to. Servants sweeping rooms, etc., are excused, but not washing without absolute necessity. A frequent custom of shaving on Sundays, is not permitted. Journeys ought not to be performed unless in necessity; but in these and all other cases, mass is always to be heard.