Thursday, 19 May 2016

The Catholic Church Alone. The One True Church of Christ. Part 68.


SIX VOLUMES IN ONE
BY THE DISTINGUISHED EXPONENTS OF CATHOLICISM
REV. HENRY DODRIDGE, D. D.
REV. HENRY EDWARD MANNING, D. D.
REV. F. LEWIS, of Granada
REV. STEPHEN KEENAN
REV. BERNARD VAUGHAN, S. J.
REV. THOMAS N. BURKE, O. P.


Q. What is the form of absolution ?

A. Our Lord Jesus Christ absolve thee, and I, by his authority, absolve thee, as far as I have power, and thou standest in need, from all thy sins, in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost. Amen.

Q. What is satisfaction ?

A. It is doing what is sufficient, or what is required from a person, for the injury he does to another.

Q. What is sacramental satisfaction ?

A. It is undergoing the penalty imposed by the priest, towards repairing the injury done to God's honor, and redeem the temporal pain due to sin.

Q. Which are the penalties whereby we may satisfy for sin?

A. In the first place, all calamities human life is subject to, when they are willingly embraced for that purpose. Again, fasting, prayer, and alms, with all other pious works.

Q. In what manner do we repair God's honor, by the aforesaid pains, and why ?

A. They are all recommended, and commanded in the Scriptures, by Almighty God. We are to submit with patience to all temporal calamities in compliance with Divine Providence. By prayer, we submit our soul, and regulate all its faculties to the divine will. By fasting, we punish the body for committing excesses. By alms, we satisfy for the ill use we make of the goods of fortune. For as all sins are committed against God, our neighbour, and ourselves; so all duties to God are contained under prayer, both internal and external; duties toward our neighbor, as acts of fraternal love, etc., are contained under alms. Duties toward ourselves, as mortification and the like, are contained under fasting.

Q. Whence have priests the power of imposing penalties or satisfactory works ?

A. From Christ, who gave them power of binding and loosing, both from sins and the penalties due to sin ; as in temporal tribunals, the power that frees from death, extends to assign, or pardon punishment, proper to reform the offender.

Q. Which are the chief properties of the penalty imposed?

A. They satisfy for the temporal pain, and ought to be medicinal, that is, proper to reform the sinner.

Q. Is satisfaction an essential part of the sacrament of penance ?

A. An intention of satisfaction is essential, but actual satisfaction, belongs only to the integrity of the sacrament; for the absolution is valid, before the satisfaction is performed; though in some cases it is requisite that satisfaction precede absolution.

Q. This doctrine of satisfaction supposes a false thing, viz.: That some pain is due to sin after the fault is pardoned.

A. Divines distinguish between eternal pain and temporal pain; the eternal pain is forgiven, but the temporal pain commonly remains, as it appears both from the necessity of the thing, the instance of David, who was punished by the death of his children, after his sins were forgiven; 2 Kings xii, and other instances of temporal calamities, inflicted for offences though pardoned. And this method of temporal pain is the foundation of our faith as to sacramental satisfaction, indulgences, purgatory and prayer for the dead.

Q. Can one person satisfy for another?

A. Yes; it is defined by the Church, and appears in the prayers of persons, etc. Yet medicinal satisfaction is personal, and cannot be communicated to another.