Wednesday, 4 May 2016

The Catholic Church Alone. The One True Church of Christ. Part 55.

SIX VOLUMES IN ONE
BY THE DISTINGUISHED EXPONENTS OF CATHOLICISM
REV. HENRY DODRIDGE, D. D.
REV. HENRY EDWARD MANNING, D. D.
REV. F. LEWIS, of Granada
REV. STEPHEN KEENAN
REV. BERNARD VAUGHAN, S. J.
REV. THOMAS N. BURKE, O. P.

Q. But notwithstanding all that has been said, is it not the greatest absurdity, and even blasphemy, to say that a man can make his God, or that a priest can turn a wafer, or a bit of bread into his Saviour?

A. It never was the belief of the Catholic Church that the bread is changed by the priest into the body and blood, soul and divinity, of Jesus Christ. We believe, indeed, as I have already said, that by the almighty power of God, making use of the minister of the priest, the bread is changed into the body of Christ: but we neither do nor ever did believe and teach, that the bread, which is a material substance, is changed into the soul, which is a spirit; much less do we believe and teach that it is changed into the divinity; nay, we believe it to be blasphemy, and heresy, to imagine any such thing: we believe, it is true, that the body and blood, soul and divinity, of Jesus Christ, are truly and really present in the blessed sacrament, and that Christ is contained whole and entire under either kind; not that the bread and wine are changed into Christ's soul or divinity; but that the bread and wine are only changed, or converted into "his body and blood; however, by the natural connexion by which Christ's body and blood (which is now risen from the dead to die no more) is always accompanied with the soul, and the divinity with both body and soul, by reason of the hypostatical union of the divine and human nature in Christ; we therefore believe that Christ's soul and divinity are also present, not by change or conversion, but by concomitance.♦ Therefore it is not our belief, that a priest can make his God, etc.

Q. Have you any thing more to add by way of proof out of Scripture, in favor of the real presence of the body and blood of Christ in the blessed sacrament ?

A. Yes, I have several more strong proofs, as, first, from the words of Christ spoken to the Jews in the sixth chapter of St. John; and secondly, from the first epistles of St. Paul to the Corinthians, the tenth and eleventh chapter; thirdly, from the ancient figures of the Eucharist, which demonstrate that there is something more noble in it than bread and wine, taken only in remembrance of Christ; fourthly, from the unerring authority of the Church in her decisions, in relation to this controversy; all which I shall here pass over for brevity sake, since they are already excellently well explained by an eminent divine, in a book entitled, " The Catholic Christian," etc.

♦See Cone. Trid. Sess. xiii. C. 3 et 4.