Saturday, 1 October 2016

The Catholic Church Alone. The One True Church of Christ. Part 154.

SIX VOLUMES IN ONE BY THE DISTINGUISHED EXPONENTS OF CATHOLICISM

REV. HENRY DODRIDGE, D. D.REV. HENRY EDWARD MANNING, D. D.REV. F. LEWIS, of Granada REV. STEPHEN KEENAN REV. BERNARD VAUGHAN, S. J. REV. THOMAS N. BURKE, O. P. 

SECTION III.—HIS DOCTRINE (LUTHERS) CONCERNING FREE-WILL, REPENTANCE, AND GOOD WORKS.

"If God foresaw," says he, "that Judas would be a traitor, Judas of necessity became a traitor. Neither was it in the power of Judas, or of any other creature to do otherwise, or to change his will," De Servo Arb. Tom. 2, fol. 460, 3.

"This is the highest degree of faith to believe God to be just, though by his own will, he lays us under a necessity of being damned; and in such a manner too, as if he took delight in tormenting the miserable." Fol. 434, 1.

"Thou shalt not covet," "is a commandment which proves us all to be sinners; since it is not in any man's power not to covet.—And the same is the drift of all the commandments, for they are all equally impossible to us." De Lib. Chris. Tom. 4, 2.

Here God, the Father of mercies, is represented as a merciless and arbitrary tyrant: commanding things which we have it not in our power to perform, and punishing the nonperformance with eternal torments.

"Free-will after sin is no more than an empty name: and when it does its best, sins mortally." Adversus Execrat. Anti. Bullam. Tom. 2, fol. 3, 2.

"Man's will is in the nature of a horse. If God sits upon it, it tends and goes as God would have it go. If the devil rides it, it tends and goes, as the devil would have it. Nor can it choose which of the riders it will run to, or seek. But the riders themselves strive who shall gain, and possess it." De Ser. Arb. Tom. 2, fol. 434, 2.

This doctrine paves the way to, and is an apology for any wickedness whatsoever. Because necessity has no law. But what follows makes large amends for it in delivering us not only from eternal damnation for any sins but infidelity. So that a man may be the most profligate sinner upon earth, and yet be in the state of salvation, if he does but believe.

" A person," says he, " that is baptized, cannot, though he would, lose his salvation by any sins how grievous soever, unless he refuses to believe. For no sins can damn him but unbelief alone." Capt. Bab. Tom. 2, fol. 74, 1.

"The contrition, with which a man reflects upon his past years in the bitterness of his soul, by considering the grievousness, the damage and baseness, the multitude of his sins, and then the loss of eternal happiness, and the incurring eternal damnation, makes him a hypocrite, and even the greater sinner." Serm. de Penit. Tom. 1, fol. 50, 2.

"The Papists teach, that faith in Christ justifies indeed, but that God's commandments are likewise to be kept. Now this is directly to deny Christ, and abolish faith." In Ep. ad Gal. Tom. 5, fol. 311, 2.

A man must be very wicked, indeed, to turn Papist, since they teach that God's commandments are to be kept. What follows is admirable.

" Let this be your rule: where the Scriptures command the doing a good work, understand it in this sense, that it forbids thee to do a good work, because thou canst not do it." Tom. 3, fol. 171, 2.

This certainly is a most golden rule, to interpret the Scriptures backwards. Not to do what they command, and to do what they forbid. Martin Luther was without all dispute the first, to whom this rule was revealed. And I presume he had it in view, when contrary to express word of God, he denied all legislative power in men.